I apprehend caducity

“I apprehend caducity” says Bennett in Margaret Drabble’s The Dark Flood Rises, a book that shows us different aspects of ageing.

The cast of older people write and read books, and they are not always against the digital, even though they come from an era when “even university press publishing parties aspired to glamour”. They read their i-pads and kindles, while still reserving a special place for the printed book. The writers have rows with their publishers “over e-books and royalties on reprints”, and can complain as so many do: “We never got to grips with the contracts for the e-books, I think the publishers took him for a ride”.

One of the characters, Teresa, dies as the result of a fall when trying to reach a book on her library shelves, but her son will never know which book it was: “Nobody will ever know. She has taken this small secret with her, and will shortly take it to her grave in St Mary’s churchyard, Kensal Green”.

Caducity: look it up.

Margaret Drabble, The Dark Flood Rises, 2016

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